Online training courses

Animal Health Australia (AHA) hosts a variety of online courses related to emergency animal disease (EAD) preparedness, arrangements and biosecurity on its eLearning platform. While some of these courses have been developed by AHA, some have also been developed by AHA’s member organisations.

Similarly, Plant Health Australia (PHA) also hosts a separate suite of online courses related to emergency plant pest and disease preparedness, arrangements and biosecurity. Although you do not need to register a separate account, you will need to log-in here to access PHA’s courses.

EAD training courses

EAD foundation course

Overview

The purpose of this course is to inform learners about how EAD responses are managed in Australia, and to give a foundation for further training in EAD response functions.

 

Content and objectives

The course content is divided into two parts.

Part 1 covers:

  • EAD awareness
  • Australia’s EAD response arrangements, including the Emergency Animal Disease Response Agreement (EADRA)
  • Australian Veterinary Emergency Plan (AUSVETPLAN)
  • phases of an EAD response.

Part 2 covers:

  • incident management system principles
  • control and coordination centres
  • working in an EAD response
  • communication and information management in an EAD response.

Having completed the course, learners should have an understanding of:

  • the significance of EADs
  • phases of an EAD response
  • the Australian animal health system
  • the roles and responsibilities (including reporting requirements) embedded within the Australian animal health system
  • national EAD arrangements and plans.

Target audience and duration

The EAD foundation course is recommended for producers, veterinarians, veterinary and animal science students, livestock industry and government personnel, and individuals who may be involved in an EAD response; however, it is publicly accessible and open to anyone with an interest in EAD response arrangements.

This course takes approximately 2 hours to complete.

More information

The EAD foundation course may or may not be a prerequisite to participating in a workshop being delivered by AHA (e.g. National Management Group, Consultative Committee on Emergency Animal Diseases, and Liaison – Livestock Industry training).

Follow these guidelines to register for the course here.

FMD awareness – protecting your livelihood and community

Overview

Developed by Biosecurity Queensland, this course aims to emphasise to learners that everyone has a role to play in preventing, reporting and responding to foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), which Australia is currently free of.

Content and objectives

This course will provide an overview of the risks that FMD pose to Australia’s communities and livestock industries, and what can be done to help prevent FMD reaching and infecting susceptible livestock.

Having completed the course, learners should:

  • understand the risks FMD poses to our livestock industries and how to help prevent an outbreak
  • be able to recognise the signs of FMD in susceptible livestock and the importance of early reporting
  • understand what would happen if an FMD incident occurred in the future.

Target audience and duration

The FMD awareness course is recommended for any personnel that work with livestock, as well as the wider community.

This course takes approximately 1 hour to complete.

More information

For more information on the course, please contact Biosecurity Queensland through their general enquiries phoneline (13 74 68).

Livestock and wool-selling agents’ EAD training

Overview

The purpose of this course is to introduce learners to EADs that could potentially affect the Australian livestock industry, the national response arrangements, and some basic principles of biosecurity.

Content and objectives

This course will increase learners’ awareness and understanding of what an EAD is, how EADs are reported and what learners should be keeping an eye out for, and what is and can be done to protect their animals and be prepared to respond if necessary. The course is divided into the following modules:

  1. What is an EAD?
  2. Why should you care about EADs?
  3. The EAD preparedness and response arrangements
  4. The importance of biosecurity in the EAD story
  5. Signs of an EAD – what should you keep an eye out for?
  6. Reporting an EAD.

Target audience and duration

The Livestock and wool-selling agents’ EAD training is recommended for livestock agents, brokers and personnel that regularly come into contact with livestock.

This course takes approximately 1 hour to complete.

Work health and safety induction in a biosecurity emergency response

Overview

The purpose of this course is to increase awareness of the main safety issues in a control centre and the field during a biosecurity emergency response (BER).

Content and objectives

This course will provide a basic work health and safety (WH&S) induction to personnel who will be working in a BER. Its contents have been divided into:

  • a general induction (core module)
  • working in a control centre (elective module)
  • working in field operations (elective module)
  • working on Infected Premises (elective module).

NB: although all elective modules are available to learners, most learners will only need to complete one elective before entering a response.

Target audience and duration

The WH&S induction in a BER course is recommended for any personnel, industry or government, entering a BER and should be completed prior to their arrival at the control centre or conducting response activities.

This course takes approximately 1 hour to complete.

More information

Upon logging in and enrolling into the course via AHA’s eLearning platform, please follow any subsequent registration instructions to access the course.

Veterinary training courses

Accreditation Program for Australian Veterinarians Registration

Overview

The Accreditation Program for Australian Veterinarians (APAV) is a national program designed to integrate private veterinary practitioners into the national animal health system to support the international standing of Australia’s animal health service capability. The program aims to have an internationally recognised process for accrediting non-government veterinarians for involvement in government and industry animal disease programs (i.e. APAV’s operational programs). To gain initial APAV accreditation, veterinarians are required to complete the APAV registration course.

The current suite of operational programs includes:

  • Accreditation program for Australian Government Accredited Veterinarians (live animal export)
  • Market assurance programs (MAPs) for the:
    • Alpaca industry (AlpacaMAP)
    • Goat industry (GoatMAP)
    • Sheep meat and wool industries (SheepMAP).

AHA maintains a database of APAV accredited veterinarians known as the National Register. This database contains the details of APAV accredited veterinarians to facilitate engagement of accredited veterinarians by government and industry with responsibility for APAV operational programs.

View the APAV Policies and Procedures here.

Content and objectives

Having completed the course, learners should have a good understanding of APAV and its operational programs, and the roles and responsibilities of accredited veterinarians and the context within which they operate. This is achieved through modules that cover:

  • Introduction to the APAV
  • Australia’s animal health system
  • International animal health issues
  • Animal disease programs
  • Responsibilities of the accredited veterinarian
  • Emergency disease responsibilities of veterinarians
  • Livestock welfare issues
  • Use of veterinary laboratories.

Target audience and duration

The APAV registration course is recommended to registered veterinarians who wish to become APAV-accredited and wish to expand their services to participate in operational programs, such s Market Assurance Programs (MAP) and the Australian Government Accredited Veterinarian Program (AAV).

This course takes approximately 4 hours to complete.

More information

Learn more.

Please contact apav@animalhealthaustralia.com.au should you have any questions on APAV or its course administration (incl. payment of course fees).

Australian Government Accredited Veterinarian

Overview

The AAVet course is an online training course for veterinarians who wish to be accredited to undertake Approved Export Programs (AEP) for livestock. An AEP must only be carried out by an Australian Government Accredited Veterinarian (AAV).

In order to become an AAV, veterinarians must meet several requirements (see below) and complete an application process – a part of which is the completion of the AAVet course.

The course aims to provide prospective AAVs an overview of the Australian livestock export industry, our legislative framework for exporting livestock, international animal health and trade organisations, AEP and the roles and responsibilities of AAVets.

Content and objectives

Having completed the course, learners should have a good understanding of the roles and responsibilities of AAVs and the context within which they operate. This is achieved through modules that cover:

  • the Australian livestock export industry
  • international organisations and agreements that affect the livestock export industry
  • importing country requirements
  • the Australian legislative framework for the livestock export industry
  • the livestock export chain
  • the AEP
  • AEPs in action: pre-export preparation
  • AEPs in action: onboard management.

Target audience and duration

The AAVet course is a prerequisite for accreditation as an AAV. It is designed to inform veterinarians involved in pre-export preparation and/or shipboard services for livestock of their legislative responsibilities.

Please note that a course administration fee of $250.00 must be paid to AHA before accessing the course materials.

Prospective AAVets must also meet other requirements, as determined by the Australian Government Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment, before becoming AAVet-accredited. This includes (but may not be limited to):

  • being a registered veterinarian by the relevant state or territory veterinary surgeons’ board from which the veterinarian is intending to conduct export work.
  • holding a current Australian Program for Accredited Veterinarians (APAV) accreditation.
  • submitting a completed application form to the Australian Government, supported with relevant documentation.
  • paying an application fee to the Australian Government.
  • paying a renewal fee to the Australian Government to maintain ongoing accreditation.

This course takes approximately 6 hours to complete, depending on background and experience within the industry.

More information

Learn more.

Please contact apav@animalhealthaustralia.com.au should you have any questions on course administration (incl. payment of course fees).

FMD training for veterinarians and veterinary paraprofessionals

Overview

The purpose of this course is to provide veterinarians and veterinary paraprofessionals with information about the clinical signs, differential diagnoses, sample collection, sample submission and diagnostics of FMD.

Content and objectives

This course will enhance learners’ understanding of FMD and its notification requirements through modules that cover:

  • susceptible species and disease transmission
  • FMD investigation and clinical presentation
  • FMD case definition
  • Differential diagnosis
  • Notification requirements
  • Interim measures following notification to Biosecurity Queensland
  • Sample collection and laboratory diagnosis of FMD
  • Sample management
  • On-farm biosecurity
  • Role of animal health professionals in an FMD incident response.

While the legislative and notification aspects of the course have a Queensland focus, most of the information is also applicable Australia-wide.

Target audience and duration

The FMD training for veterinarians and veterinary paraprofessionals course is recommended for any animal health professionals, especially those that work with FMD-susceptible species.

This course takes approximately 4 hours to complete.

More information

Completion of this course is recognised by the Australian Veterinary Association’s continuing professional development (CPD) points system, for which learners will earn three (3) VetEd points upon completion.

A training video, ‘Recognising foot-and-mouth disease (FMD)’ to help animal health professionals recognise the clinical signs of FMD is also available here. Please note that the images of infected animals used in the production of this video were obtained from overseas sources.

For more information on the course, please contact Biosecurity Queensland through their general enquiries phoneline (13 74 68).

Market Assurance Program

Overview

The Australian Johne’s disease MAPs are a key strategy in the control of Johne’s Disease in Australia. AHA maintains a MAP training program and associated resources to assist veterinarians to complete the training necessary to meet the requirements of the MAP. Veterinarians wishing to obtain approved status as MAP veterinarians are required to meet a number of prerequisites which include current veterinary registration, prior APAV accreditation and completion of MAP training.

Content and objectives

This course will increase learners’ understanding of Johne’s disease and the measures taken to test for, prevent, control and manage the disease in Australia through the following modules:

  • Key points about Johne’s disease
  • How Johne’s disease behaves
  • Testing for Johne’s disease
  • Prevention and control
  • MAPs
  • Getting started in MAP.

Target audience and duration

This MAP course is recommended for veterinarians wishing to become MAP-accredited veterinarians for SheepMAP as part of meeting their training requirements. Veterinarians who are working with beef and dairy cattle producers or goat owners may also wish to do this training (however APAV is not essential for them).

This course takes approximately 2 hours to complete.

More information

For more information click here.

National Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies Surveillance Project training guide

Overview

The purpose of this course is to provide supporting information to animal health professionals collecting sample submissions for the National Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies Surveillance Project (NTSESP).

Content and objectives

This course will provide learners with an understanding of the correct methods of collecting surveillance samples and key considerations that are associated with them through the following sections:

  1. Introduction to the National Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSE) Freedom Assurance Program and the NTSESP
  2. Clinical signs of TSEs
  3. Methods for removing brains for TSE testing and claiming incentives
  4. Work health and safety considerations
  5. Further information.

Target audience and duration

The NTSESP training guide is recommended for animal health professionals who will be responsible for collecting surveillance samples and submitting these as part of the NTSESP.

This course takes approximately 30 minutes to complete.

More information

For more information click here.